Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day in Australia

The Effects of Developmental Language Disorder are Overwhelming, So Here’s What You Need To Know

 

What is Developmental Language Disorder?

Developmental Language Disorder affects the child’s linguistic and communication abilities. Children with developmental language disorder struggle to communicate their thoughts and needs, leading to various other problems. 

Developmental Language Disorder broadly includes difficulties in language development, speech disorders, reading disabilities, and writing disabilities. Developmental language disorder (DLD), also known as Specific Language Impairment, is a disability in which a person can understand and use language but has difficulty speaking and writing.

Diagnosis of Developmental Language Disorder can be from birth up until the age of 18 years old. People often misunderstand and misdiagnose Developmental Language Disorders (DLDs). The misunderstanding is because they can affect different areas of the brain. These areas relate to both speaking and writing. DLD can also vary in severity from mild to severe, with some people having more disabilities than others. Furthermore, DLDs are not always limited to language alone but can also affect other cognitive skills, making it difficult to understand them.

Two children in an average Australian classroom have Developmental Language Disorder.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of DLD in Children?

Symptoms of developmental language disorder include difficulty understanding grammar rules, difficulty expressing thoughts or ideas verbally or in writing, mispronouncing words or skipping words when speaking or reading aloud, repeating sounds over and over again when speaking or reading aloud, inability to make sentences from pictures shown to them

1) Speech:

Children with DLD may have difficulty pronouncing words and sounds, and it can be hard for them to form sentences. They may also have a hard time producing the correct number of syllables in words.

2) Language:

Children with DLD may not ask questions or respond to questions appropriately, and they sometimes repeat the same sentence repeatedly. Children with severe language delays may not talk at all.

3) Reading:

Children with DLD often struggle with reading comprehension, making it difficult to go through any reading material they receive in school. They also might struggle to recognize individual letters or numbers in their native language.

4) Writing:

A child who struggles with writing is often unable to write sentences that make sense.

What are the childhood Development Stages?

Childhood development stages have five stages: Cognitive, Social and Emotional, Speech and Language, Fine Motor Skills, and Gross Motor Skill Development. These stages are not rigid, and age groups often overlap. However, each stage has its own set of appropriate developmental milestones, and disorders may occur during this time in a child’s life. Children develop in many different ways, at a different rates. Children with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) can experience a developmental delay that causes them to progress slower than their peers.

Cognitive Development.

Cognitive development is the way that the brain learns and develops over time. A child’s cognitive development starts at birth and continues throughout their life. Their mental development begins with newborn reflexes, progresses to simple thoughts, and eventually leads to complex reasoning. The cognitive stages are preoperational (2-7 years) and concrete operations (7+ years). Preoperational children cannot use symbols or pictures representing objects because they do not understand how the world works symbolically. They also have difficulty forming more than one concept of an object at once, such as understanding that a rock can be hard and round. In concrete operations, children can logically think about abstract concepts like shape, size, number and comprehend and deal with more abstract concepts such as equality and conservation.

Social and Emotional Development.

Social and Emotional Development is where infants learn to socialize with other people, express their emotions, and develop unique personalities.  The early years of life are crucial for a child’s growth and development. Children need emotional support from their parents, caregivers, and other adults to feel comfortable taking risks, exploring their world, accepting new people into their lives, developing close friendships, and resolving conflicts appropriately.

Speech and Language Development.

During this stage, infants are learning to speak. They are using words by pointing to objects or showing what they want. They are also learning to pronounce words better as more words come out of their mouths more often.

Fine Motor Skill Development.

This stage of development is when infants are trying to become more independent due to gaining motor skills that allow them to move more on their own without any help from an adult or caregiver around them all of the time.

Gross Motor Skill Development.

During this stage, infants learn to stand, walk and then run. Proper muscle development is required to enable movements at this stage.

Effects on Social Interaction and Self-Esteem

Language development is a complex process, and when it is hampered, it can lead to social disability or low self-esteem in children. Children with DLD are prone to mental health illnesses compare to other children. It is essential to encourage their children to speak and allow them the opportunity to input into the family’s activities. Children with DLD are prone to mental health illnesses compared to other children as they have trouble expressing their emotions and behavior. They are also likely to experience bullying at school, resulting in distress. Speech therapy can help in rehabilitation.

A Guide to Coping with Developmental Language Disorder

1) Recognize the signs of DLD so you can get help from a doctor as soon as possible.

2) Understand how DLD affects your day-to-day life so you know what to expect and what accommodations might work for you.

3) Look after yourself – learn how to avoid or avoid becoming frustrated, learn some coping skills, set boundaries, and take part in self-care activities regularly.

Helping Your Child Cope with DLD by Using These 5 Strategies

The first strategy is to encourage the child to use assistive devices.

The second strategy is to find solutions that are both functional and fun.

The third strategy is to identify what triggers anxiety. By understanding these triggers, you can plan for them accordingly.

The fourth strategy is to develop coping mechanisms that reduce anxiety and stress levels.

Lastly, the fifth strategy is to help your child set goals that they can achieve with DLD to feel empowered instead of frustrated.

In summary, it is essential to remember that children with developmental language disorder are still children. While this disability can be frustrating and cause many tears, it does not define them. Take the time to explore their unique skills, even if it is just singing a song together. When you encourage them, they will strive to use language in their own way to communicate with you. Even if they can’t talk to you, they are still here to tell you their story.

Let us support you!

Do you know anyone who could benefit fit from our services? Grace healthcare- YCYW is committed to providing the best possible service to our clients, their families, and the wider community. We are here to support you to live your best life – Your care Your way.  If you would like to know more about Grace Healthcare YCYW services, please contact us at +61 410 377 690 or +61  03 9087 8230. Alternatively, you could complete our contact form or email us at info@grace-healthcare.com.au. Our team is available 24/7, waiting to be of your assistance to you.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

The Complete Guide to Depression and How It is Affecting Your Mental Health
Depression is an authentic condition that can take many forms. Depression is a severe illness that can take a tremendous toll on your life, including your work and relationships. When you are depressed, it’s hard to think about anything other than your condition and how stressed you are. Living with depression can be highly distressing …

Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day in Australia Read More »

Covid-19 Declaration Form
The health, safety, and wellbeing of everyone within Grace Healthcare – YCYW workplaces, including employees, contractors, visitors, the public, neighbors, and the community, is our highest priority. As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, Grace Healthcare – YCYW is applying various processes to safeguard everyone in our workplaces. This Questionnaire must be completed by all …

Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day in Australia Read More »

Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day in Australia
The Effects of Developmental Language Disorder are Overwhelming, So Here’s What You Need To Know   What is Developmental Language Disorder? Developmental Language Disorder affects the child’s linguistic and communication abilities. Children with developmental language disorder struggle to communicate their thoughts and needs, leading to various other problems.  Developmental Language Disorder broadly includes difficulties in …

Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day in Australia Read More »